Images from the Charcoal Forest
Images from the Charcoal Forest

Wildcrafted charcoal, wildcrafted earth pigments. arches cold press 140 lb., remnants of burn piles, small cabinet of handmade paints from acorns, charcoal earth pigments, and rust. Wall: 90” T x 51” W. Floor: 36” D x 87” W.

A time-based musing on self care, expanding the notion of “self” to to include surrounding life and environment, and synergistic relationships between ourselves, each other, and all the rest. I nurtured the creative sparks from this project, through collaboration, into flames whose embers will always burn in the home fires of my heart and soul. As I move forward, my reflection is that I hope to diligently feed the flames generated from the fuel of this project with new adventures in earth, fire, water, debris, self care, wilderness awareness, and synergy.

Thank you Tia Factor, Ryan Pierce, Gary Wiseman, Michael Krochta, and Racheal Freifelder, for being generous with your time, wisdom and encouragement, and for helping to shape my perspective with your teachings.

MelissaMcGhie-Littman-20.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-1.jpg
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MelissaMcGhie-Littman-5.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-6.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-7.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-8.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-10.jpg
Mylar/celium
Mylar/celium

These balloons were collected from Mt. Hood National Forest by Michael Krochta from Bark. The name alludes to the material of the balloon and the nutrient seeking hairs on the ends of soil fungus, called Mycelium. Many of them collected small pockets of soil, and began undergoing processes that serve to decompose anything that falls on the forest floor. What purpose do they serve now that their parties are over?

MelissaMcGhie-Littman-15.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-16.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-17.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-18.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-19.jpg
Images from the Charcoal Forest
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-20.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-1.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-3.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-4.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-5.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-6.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-7.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-8.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-10.jpg
Mylar/celium
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-15.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-16.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-17.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-18.jpg
MelissaMcGhie-Littman-19.jpg
Images from the Charcoal Forest

Wildcrafted charcoal, wildcrafted earth pigments. arches cold press 140 lb., remnants of burn piles, small cabinet of handmade paints from acorns, charcoal earth pigments, and rust. Wall: 90” T x 51” W. Floor: 36” D x 87” W.

A time-based musing on self care, expanding the notion of “self” to to include surrounding life and environment, and synergistic relationships between ourselves, each other, and all the rest. I nurtured the creative sparks from this project, through collaboration, into flames whose embers will always burn in the home fires of my heart and soul. As I move forward, my reflection is that I hope to diligently feed the flames generated from the fuel of this project with new adventures in earth, fire, water, debris, self care, wilderness awareness, and synergy.

Thank you Tia Factor, Ryan Pierce, Gary Wiseman, Michael Krochta, and Racheal Freifelder, for being generous with your time, wisdom and encouragement, and for helping to shape my perspective with your teachings.

Mylar/celium

These balloons were collected from Mt. Hood National Forest by Michael Krochta from Bark. The name alludes to the material of the balloon and the nutrient seeking hairs on the ends of soil fungus, called Mycelium. Many of them collected small pockets of soil, and began undergoing processes that serve to decompose anything that falls on the forest floor. What purpose do they serve now that their parties are over?

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